Writer ?

Interested in writing articles, reviews etc., but don't know where to publish it ?. Don't worry, software helper provides you the opportunity to publish your articles, reviews etc., in our Writer's Corner Section. If you contribute articles regularly to software helper, you will become one of the Official writers of softwareonlinehelper.blogspot.com Submit your articlesEmail me!
Photobucket If you're looking for more information within or out of this site, you can search Google . Google is the fastest and the most reliable search engine on the net today. Type in the Google search box below, the key words of the information you want like "free mobile software". Add google search box and other specific keywords to get a more relevant search engine results for the information, resources or ideas you are looking for.
Search here
Custom Search

Share This On

Tuesday, December 25, 2007

LTS Web Site templates

Below are a series of templates that you can download to make the process of creating your new Web Site a lot easier and faster. The templates have been fully tested on a variety of different browsers and are accessibility compliant and also comply with the University of Leicester corporate ID. Some of the templates below are available to download in different colours, if however you need one of the templates below in a specific colour you can contact the Learning Technology Section if you do not already know how to do it yourself.

These templates have been created using Dreamweaver, and therefore work best in Dreamweaver, however the templates have been tested in Frontpage too.

In order to use these templates effectively you can also download a PDF tutorial that will help and show you how to edit these templates successfully and change the content for your own.

Preview and Download the templates

A blank template with just a header and footer.
Header and footer- ZIP 19KB

An individual/personal page template.



A 3 column template that will automatically resize with your browser window. The download includes both a home page and a normal page.
Blue 3 column- ZIP 95KB

Green 3 column- ZIP 95KB
Purple 3 column- ZIP 95KB
Red 3 column ZIP- 95KB



A 2 column template that will automatically resize with your browser window. The download includes both a home page and a normal page.
Blue 2 column- ZIP 69KB
Green 2 column- ZIP 69KB
Purple 2 column- ZIP 69KB
Red 2 column- ZIP 69KB


A 3 column template that will remain fixed in the centre of your browser window. The download includes both a home page and a normal page.

A 2 column template that will remain fixed in the centre of your browser window. The download includes both a home page and a normal page.Preview fixed 2 column normal page template.
Blue fixed 2 column- ZIP 69KB
Green fixed 2 column- ZIP 69KB
Purple fixed 2 column- ZIP 69KB
Red fixed 2 column- ZIP 69KB

A 3 column template that will remain fixed in the centre of your browser window with the third column floating. The download includes both a home page and a normal page.

Getting started


Summary:
Information on assembling a Web team to do your site, the importance of knowing your audience and knowing what to avoid. Plus the importance of writing a site specification document.

Supplement your understanding of the topics covered in this section by attending the following Staff Development course: Web wise

Assemble a Web team

Decide which skills and knowledge, and therefore which people, you will need to create your Web Site. Do you have someone with knowledge of the content that you intend to turn into a site - as this is essential for shaping the structure/organisation of the site? Will you need a designer to give the site a particular look? Do you have knowledge of a Web Site creation package like Dreamweaver or Frontpage to be able to create Web pages? How much of the work will you be doing yourself or will you be paying someone else to do it for you?

Know your audience

Think about the people who might use your site and then from day one create the site with them in mind. A well planned site should be able to cater for different levels of user - novice through advanced. If your audience are used to a particular organisational structure then mirroring that with a Web Site may prove beneficial. If you're really serious about finding out what makes your audience tick then you might want to conduct some research.

Knowing what to avoid

The best way to avoid problems with your own site is to look at other people's Web sites, including your competitors (if you have any). Decide what works and what doesn't - learn from others' mistakes. Be inspired but don't copy.

Write a site spec document

Write a document that will act as a blueprint for your Web Site. It should say how long you expect the project to take, aims, objectives, outcomes and how you might measure the success of your Web. You may have to make modifications to your plan as you go along but having a clear idea about what it is you are trying to achieve will result in a much better site than if you have no clear vision.

You can download an example site spec with some ideas of what to think about when writing your own site specification.

Basic Computer Skills


These short courses will equip the new computer user and those who wish to go over the basics, with essential skills.

Using Your Computer

This is the essential course to get you started using your computer. The primary objective is to build your computer confidence by learning the basics to control the computer, check email and surf the web.

Introduction to Email using Outlook 2003

New to Outlook 2003 or email? This short course will introduce you to the basic operations of Outlook 2003 and get you communicating via email.

Browsing The Web

This course introduces you into an exciting world of online resources and services in the areas of news, government, consumer, travel, education/training, employment, health, interest groups and business. It will also address some of the issues and risks associated with using the Internet.

Microsoft Word 2003 - Introduction

If you have never used Word before or are interested in finding about a bit more about some of the basics before moving on to the next level, then this course is for you. Using ‘hands-on’ and practical exercises, this course will provide you with a working understanding of the basic features of Microsoft Word.

Managing Your Files and Folders

Is your Documents bursting at the seams with individual files? How much time do you spend looking for documents? Does it seem like you are in a constant battle with your storage quota? There is a better way: manage your files more effectively. This course will introduce or broaden your knowledge of managing electronic files and folders. It will help you understand the different storage locations (drives) available and provide you with the tools to effectively organise your increasing numbers of files and folders.

Mozilla Firefox 1.0

A decade ago, geeks greeted the release of Netscape's new web browser with great anticipation. A similar sense of expectation surrounded each subsequent version of Netscape Navigator and, to a much lesser extent, updates to Microsoft's upstart Internet Explorer.


All that excitement came to an end three or four years ago, when Microsoft seemed to have won the so-called browser wars and promptly stopped adding new features to IE. But it was déjà vu all over again Tuesday, complete with swamped servers and abused refresh keys, with the release of Firefox 1.0.

The Mozilla Foundation, inheritor of the Netscape programming code base, made the very first non-beta version of its open-source browser available for free at 1 a.m. PT Tuesday. Soon after its release, Mozilla's servers were overwhelmed.

Firefox 1.0, available for the Windows, Linux and Mac operating systems in more than a dozen languages, is the result of two years of work. The browser is an absolute joy to use -- smart, fast and very user-friendly, while still offering a slew of advanced programmable and customizable functions for those who want to tinker.

In a press release, the Mozilla Foundation states that Firefox 1.0 is more compatible with websites written specifically for Internet Explorer than the beta versions that preceded it, and has new updating capabilities which will grab and install new browser versions, extensions or security fixes automatically.

There's also a new find function that appears in a toolbar across the bottom of the page, better bookmarking, more flexible pop-up blocking, live bookmarks that display Really Simple Syndication, or RSS, news feeds from the bookmark itself or in a sidebar, and good online fraud-protection features.

I'd downloaded the preview release of Firefox 1.0 (Firefox 1.0PR) about three weeks ago, along with about 8 million other people, according to the Mozilla Foundation's download stats. I didn't see -- and didn't expect to see -- much that was visibly new in the final 1.0 version as compared to the preview, but those who are still using 0.9 or earlier versions will find a good collection of great new features.

The final version feels a bit snappier than the preview release did. Web pages seem to be coming up a few seconds faster, but that's a subjective opinion -- I didn't time the page loads. There is a short list of bug fixes that have been incorporated into the final release of version 1.0.

I installed Firefox 1.0 on three machines -- one PC running Windows XP which has been running Firefox as a primary browser for more than a year, another PC running Windows XP Service Pack 2 (XP2), whose user runs Internet Explorer exclusively, and a Mac running OS X version 10.2 with Apple Computer's Safari browser.

Installation on all three machines was almost flawless. On the XP PC, I didn't even uninstall the previous version of Firefox, as you are supposed to. The program still installed perfectly, moved my bookmarks and settings over to the new version quickly and booted and ran without problems. I've had big issues with running previous versions of Firefox (the 0.9 series) without uninstalling the older version first.

Installing Firefox on the XP2 and Mac machines was just as easy, although not completely without problems, on the Mac. After the installation routine finished, a dialog box opened and offered to move settings and bookmarks (favorites, as Explorer refers to them) from IE/Safari to Firefox. After selecting yes, all settings were quickly applied and all bookmarks were moved from the PC without a snag. Safari didn't seem to want to give up the bookmarks, so I used a third-party utility.

The only problem with the XP2 machine was that many of my extensions -- plug-in programs that add extra features to Firefox -- weren't compatible with version 1.0. They'd all worked with the preview version, so I'd expected them to work with the final release.

Firefox does have a nifty auto-update feature for extensions. Most of my extensions have now been updated, although a couple remain unusable until their programmers update them for 1.0.

Firefox has long boasted the best and easiest-to-use privacy settings of any browser, allowing users full control of the contents of their history, saved form, saved passwords, cookies and cache files. The browser's integrated pop-up ad blocker can be configured to allow specific sites to spawn new windows (some websites, like many car rental sites, rely on pop-ups), and the browser can also be customized to allow specified sites to install software.

Download Now - Free

Entry level knowledge

Entry level knowledge

Summary
To move on from having a design and a plan to actually building a site you need to have a minimum level of computer skill and Web awareness. The information and guides in the 'Build it' section assume a basic level of understanding/competence in areas such as key terminology, using a computer and managing files/folders, the Web, email, image editing, text editing and accessibility.

Supplement your understanding of the topics covered in this section by attending the following Staff Development course: Introduction to Dreamweaver MX2004
Getting around on the PC

It sounds almost too basic to mention but you need to be sure that you have the necessary minimum level of knowledge about getting around on a PC and doing things before you attempt a project like a Web Site, otherwise you'll be facing an uphill battle. This basic level of skill is not difficult to gain with just a few practice sessions but is absolutely vital. So ask yourself the following simple questions and don't take the next step (creating a Web Site) until you can answer 'yes' to them all.

1. Do I know how to start a computer and get into the Windows environment?
2. Do I know how to use the mouse to move the cursor arrow around the Windows environment?
3. Do I know how to select/open files and programs using the mouse buttons and then close them down after i've used them?
4. Do I know the difference between a file and folder and how to use them to store/organise information?
5. Do I know how to save files to the computer's hard disk or floppy disk?
6. Do I know how to print documents?
7. Do I know how to send an email?
8. Do I know how to use the CD-ROM drive?
9. Do I know how to install a program?
10. Do I know how to restart/shutdown my PC?

If you are uncertain how to do any of the above things then the best thing to do is get some training/help either from Staff Development, external training agencies or a friend or colleague who does know.
Copying, cutting and pasting

Its one of the most useful things you can learn to do on a PC if you are writing a document or making a Web Site. Copy, Cut and Paste are explained below with their shortcut keys displayed in brackets ().

Copy (CTRL-C): Makes a copy of whatever text, image, file or folder you've selected and stores it inside the computers memory in an area called the 'clipboard' for use later.

Cut (CTRL-X): Removes whatever text, image, file or folder you've selected and stores it internally in the 'clipboard'.

Paste (CTRL-V): Puts back the copied or cut files in a new location determined by where ever you have placed the cursor or mouse pointer.

Clearly this can be useful for making backup copies of your files in other locations on your PC or on an network. One thing to be careful of is if you paste a copied file back in same location you coped it from - in this situation the computer is forced to rename the file to avoid overwriting the original file and will generally call the file 'copy of ...' .
Using the Web

A general familiarity with the Internet is always useful when creating a Web Site. It would be beneficial to be aware of how to use browsers like Internet Explorer to visit Web pages - and this would include understanding how to type in Web addresses, use bookmarks to save favourite Web pages and how to download files you need from other Web Sites. It would also be useful to know how to use Search Engines like Google to locate/research information you need for your site.

Getting started

Assemble a Web team

Decide which skills and knowledge, and therefore which people, you will need to create your Web Site. Do you have someone with knowledge of the content that you intend to turn into a site - as this is essential for shaping the structure/organisation of the site? Will you need a designer to give the site a particular look? Do you have knowledge of a Web Site creation package like Dreamweaver or Frontpage to be able to create Web pages? How much of the work will you be doing yourself or will you be paying someone else to do it for you?
Know your audience

Think about the people who might use your site and then from day one create the site with them in mind. A well planned site should be able to cater for different levels of user - novice through advanced. If your audience are used to a particular organisational structure then mirroring that with a Web Site may prove beneficial. If you're really serious about finding out what makes your audience tick then you might want to conduct some research.
Knowing what to avoid

The best way to avoid problems with your own site is to look at other people's Web sites, including your competitors (if you have any). Decide what works and what doesn't - learn from others' mistakes. Be inspired but don't copy.
Write a site spec document

Write a document that will act as a blueprint for your Web Site. It should say how long you expect the project to take, aims, objectives, outcomes and how you might measure the success of your Web. You may have to make modifications to your plan as you go along but having a clear idea about what it is you are trying to achieve will result in a much better site than if you have no clear vision.

Link Exchange With Me

If you want to link exchange with me, add my blog into your site and drop me a comment. I will do the same immediately. Happy Exchange :)
Add to Google
PhotobucketPhotobucketNew, unique and user-friendly software solutionsFind the software you're looking for,the most comprehensive source for free-to-try software downloads.Free Internet marketing resources, web site development tutorials, ecommerce strategies & software solutions. Shopping cart reviews & affiliate marketing guides & articles, plus search engine marketing resources & tools. Submit Your Site To The Web's Top 50 Search Engines for Free!ExactSeek - Relevant Search Blog Search: The Source for Blogsfree search engine website submission top optimization Software Top Blogs Technology blogs Software blog directory Fantasy blogs Back Link Site Website Traffic Tracker Subscribe in a reader

Add to Google Reader or Homepage

Add to Plusmo

Subscribe in Bloglines

Add to My AOL

Add to Webwag

Technorati Profile Add to Technorati Favorites
 

© Make money online | Watch online free videos